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A long-term plan for logical properties?

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The CSS Working Group is discussing ‘logical properties’ today with the Internationalization Working Group – and there’s a great new article on the topic this week from Jeremy Keith.

Container Queries in Browsers!

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After nearly 15 years as a highly-requested feature in CSS – and 15 years being told it was impossible – (size) Container Queries and units have shipped in both Chrome/Edge 105, and Safari 16! Firefox is not far behind.

Intrinsic CSS with Container Queries & Units

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Container queries & units have a lot to offer as we enter a more content-out era of Intrinsic Web Design, but they also come with some limitations of their own. Join Miriam to learn about how the feature works, how to start using it in production, and what to look forward to as Container Queries continue to evolve.

A Whole Cascade of Layers

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I really enjoyed Dave Rupert’s Modern alternatives to BEM, which concludes with a link to my redesign. So let’s talk about my seven-layer burrito of styles – what he calls SBRDFLT. What’s that all about?

Use the Right Container Query Syntax

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Since we got a first look at a Container Queries prototype back in April 2021, the syntax has changed a few times. But now the spec is stable, browsers are getting ready to ship, and it’s time to make sure you’re using the same syntax they are!

Styling the Intrinsic Web

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I talk with Noel Minchow about how to style the intrinsic web, what that means, and how it’s compatible with responsive design.

Cascading Layers of !mportance

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Earlier this year, all the major browsers released Cascade Layers, with the potential to fundamentally change how we write styles. But fundamental changes require us to re-think how all the pieces fit together.

Not All Zeros are Equal

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There’s a well-established ‘best practice’ that CSS authors (as well as linters and minifiers) should remove units from any 0 value. It’s a fine rule in most cases, but there are a few common situations where it will break your code.

Body Margin 8px

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All browsers add an 8px margin on the body element – it’s part of the w3c-recommended default stylesheet which browsers generally use as a starting point for their own ‘user agent’ styles. But why 8px? Where does that come from?

The Gray Areas of HWB Color

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Working on Sass support for color spaces, I ran into a question about the proper handling of hwb() colors. That lead me down a rabbit hole, exploring the edges of hwb (and powerless color channels) in CSS.

Every Transition is a Page Transition?

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There’s a new web API proposal for transitioning shared-elements across pages. It’s great for making smooth page transitions, but what if we apply it to individual elements with changing styles on a single page?

Complex vs Compound Selectors

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In CSS, there are compound selectors and also complex selectors, and I never remember which is which. Do you need to learn the difference? Probably not. But I’m tired of looking it up.

Teleportation, PapayaWhip, and Cookies

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I talk with Claire and Steph about changes to the Container Query syntax, our feelings about web components, named CSS colors, how much we like eating cookies, and other wild tangents.

Making Sense of CSS Layers and Scope

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CSS is evolving rapidly and new features come online all the time. Join Morten & Miriam to talk about what CSS layers and scope are all about and how they will change how we work with and think about the cascade in the future.

Developing the Future of the Internet

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Miriam talks to Now What? about why the internet looks the way it does, why designers and developers need to collaborate and how the future of the web must be built around inclusivity and respect.

Styling the Intrinsic Web

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Over the last decade, Responsive Web Design and Object Oriented CSS have grown from exciting new trends into the foundations of modern, component-driven web design. But our medium is not done evolving.

What’s Happening in CSS & Sass

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A podcast focusing on front end development but also covering a wide range of web development and design topics. We talked about CSS, Sass, and work being done in the W3C CSS Working Group.

CSSWG, Container Queries, Scope, and Layers

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I talk with Claire and Steph about my journey into webdev and onto the CSSWG, what I find frustrating about how others use CSS, and the three specs I’m working on.

Support (Not) Unknown

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Working on a new CSS feature like Container Queries, one of the most important considerations is to ensure a “migration path” – a way for developers to start integrating the new code, without breaking their sites on legacy browsers.

Container Queries & the CSSWG

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I chat with Bruce Lawson & Vadim Makeev about Sass & Susy, CSS Layers & compatibility, Container Queries, and the CSS Working Group.

What Is The Future Of CSS?

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Starting a new season of the Smashing Podcast with a look at the future of CSS. What new specs will be landing in browsers soon? Drew McLellan talks to Miriam to find out.

Container Queries Explainer & Proposal

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Media-queries allow an author to make style changes based on the overall viewport dimensions – but in many cases, authors would prefer styling modular components based on their context within a layout.

Container Queries & The Future of CSS

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New CSS proposals like Container Queries, Cascade Layers, Scoped Styles, and Nesting are all aimed at improving the way we write responsive components and design systems.

Beyond CSS Variables

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CSS Custom Properties (aka Cascading Variables) have gained broad browser support since 2015 – but what are they good for, and why do we need them?

CSS, Sass, and Playwriting

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I join Ari, Ben, and Tessa to talk about getting into CSS from other languages, the absurdly massive problem CSS is designed to solve, and the mental model behind the language.

Open CSS Notebook

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As I spend more of my time working on the CSS language, I wanted a place to take notes and explore new ideas in the open.

Dissecting CSS Conventions

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How do we write code that is modular & maintainable, in a language designed to be systematic & contextual?

When Variables Cascade

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The Cascade makes CSS unique – forcing us to revisit even the most common programming feature: the variable.

Cascade Aligned Programming

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From the very start, “web design” has posed a nearly impossible paradox.

Custom Property “Stacks"

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CSS Custom Properties allow us to manage and control both cascade and inheritance in new ways.

Design Systems AMA

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Jina and I answer questions about CSS, Sass, Design Systems, and more!

Authoring the future of CSS

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A spinoff of the Party Corgi Network discord. I chat with Chris Biscardi about The CSS Working Group, open-source projects, art, and music.

Use new selectors responsibly with selector queries

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Firefox 69 was the first to implement selector feature queries, but other browsers are following suit. I’ll show you how it works, and how to start using this new feature query right away.

How do you wrap long words in CSS?

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Horizontal text overflow has always been difficult to manage on the web. The default visible overflow is designed to make sure content remains accessible no matter the size of a containing box, but it’s not our only option.

CSS Most Normalizer-est

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Why waste your time on half-measures? Make your site THE MOST NORMALEST with this ULTIMATE CSS RESET.

Scroll Snap in CSS

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When we’re scrolling down a page, or through a gallery of images, snap-targets can help guide us from one section or image to the next. In the past, developers have used JavaScript to hijack scrolling, but now we can manage scroll alignment directly in CSS with only a few lines of code.

Inner & Outer Values of the Display Property

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The display property has been in CSS from the beginning, handling everything from block and inline boxes to list-items and full layout systems like flexbox or grid. Now the display syntax is getting an upgrade to match it’s multiple uses.

On Sass & CSS

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I drop by the show to talk about Sass in 2019, design tokens, Oddbird, unused CSS, new CSS properties, and Dave & Chris’ explanation of revert.

Why isn’t this CSS doing anything?

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There are a number of property & value combinations that can lead to CSS being inactive, and now Firefox will tell you why. Open the developer tools, and look for the greyed-out property with an info-box on hover.

Laying out Forms using Subgrid

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It’s a common pattern to align form labels and inputs in grid-like layout. I’ll show you how to do it quickly using CSS subgrid, with several quick fallbacks.

CSS is Rad

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The web is designed to work across platforms, devices, languages, and interfaces – but how can we possibly design for that unknown and always-changing canvas?

Subgrid for Better Card Layouts

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Card layouts are popular on the web, rows and columns of boxes with similar content. CSS grids can help align those cards, but it’s still be hard to line-up content inside the cards – headers and footers that might need more or less room.

Faster Layouts with CSS Grid

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For years, we’ve struggled to build resilient layouts on the web, but CSS Grid promises to change all that – and you can start using it now, with only a few properties and basic concepts.

What does revert do in CSS?

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I’ve often used initial and unset in my CSS – global keywords that can be applied to any property. The difference is small, but important: unset allows inheritance, while initial does not. But then Firefox implemented revert and I was confused – how is this one different from the others?!

Introducing Sass Modules

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Sass recently launched a new module system. The new syntax will replace @import with @use and @forward – a big step forward for making Sass partials more readable, performant, and safe.

Why is CSS so Weird?

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Love it or hate it, CSS is weird: not quite markup, not quite programming in the imperative sense, and nothing like the design programs we use for print. How did we get here?

Styling Lists in CSS

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When you create lists in HTML, browsers add bullet-points or numbers we call list markers. Now CSS gives us the tools to style those list markers, and even create our own!

F*CSS

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In the CSS naming-convention arms race to lowest specificity, I’ve decided to only use universal * selectors. I call it F*CSS.

Design Systems & CSS

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We start by talking about design systems and design tooling – how they differ, and the problems they solve.

CSS Custom Properties In The Cascade

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Pushing past the “variable” metaphor, CSS Custom Properties can provide new ways to balance context and isolation in our patterns and components.

Resilient Web Systems

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From building beautiful sites to maintaining complex design systems across multiple applications, CSS is the web-language of design.

On Dynamic CSS

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Thunder Nerds interview me before my talk at VueConf US 2019.

Fonts & more

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The panel and the guest talk about grid systems, fonts, and more!

Ethics, ES6 in Practice, and Dynamic CSS

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On Episode 18, the TalkScript team continues the live-ish at JSConfUS podcast series with guests Myles Borins, Tim Doherty, and Miriam Suzanne. Listen in!

Dynamic CSS – layouts & beyond

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Don’t let the declarative syntax fool you – CSS is a powerful and dynamic programming language.

Agile Design Systems

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Style Guides & Pattern Libraries are great tools for documenting the relationships between code and design, but beautiful docs are only half the battle.

More CSS Charts, with Grid & Custom Properties

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Inspired by Robin Rendle, I demonstrate some of my early experiments combining CSS Grids and custom properties to create dynamic layouts and data-visualizations.

Don’t Use My Grid System

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Explore the history of web layout with the creator of Susy – why grid systems exist, how they work, and practical tips to avoid using them.

Fun with Viewport Units

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Viewport units have been around for several years now, with near-perfect support in the major browsers, but I keep finding new and exciting ways to use them. I thought it would be fun to review the basics, and then round-up some of my favorite use-cases.

Getting Started with CSS Grid

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It feels like CSS Grid has been coming for a long time now, but it just now seems to be reaching a point where folks are talking more and more about it and that it’s becoming something we should learning.

Loops in CSS Preprocessors

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No matter what acronym drives your selectors (BEM, OOCSS, SMACSS, ETC), loops can help keep your patterns more readable and maintainable, baking them directly into your code. We’ll take a look at what loops can do, and how to use them in the major CSS preprocessors.

An Interview with Miriam Suzanne

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Chris Coyier interviews Miriam when she joins the CSS Tricks team as a Staff Writer. We talk about gettting started in the industry, name confusion, fouding OddBird, building Susy, and more.

Code Patterns for Pattern Making

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Style Guides & Pattern Libraries are great tools for documenting the relationships between code and design, but beautiful docs are only half the battle.

User Unfriendly

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A project-manager’s reflections on human-centered problem-solving, client communication, and user feedback in agile web development.